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KLGAFE has ended
We invite you to join us for the Google in Education Kuala Lumpur Summit produced by the EdTechTeam, to be held at the International School of Kuala Lumpur Ampang Campus on  November 23 & 24, 2013 . This high intensity two day event focuses on deploying, integrating, and using Google Apps for Education and other Google Tools to promote student learning in K-12 and higher education. The program features Google Certified Teachers, Google Apps for Education Certified Trainers, practicing administrators, solution providers, Google engineers, and representatives from the Google education teams. 

Register now to send teachers, administrators, tech directors, library media specialists, tech support staff, CTOs, and anyone who is interested in finding out more about leveraging Google Apps for Education to support student learning.

Resources for Sessions 
avatar for Rushton Hurley

Rushton Hurley

Next Vista for Learning
Executive Director
San Jose, California
Rushton Hurley is an educator who believes this is a great time to teach. In his work, he has taught Japanese language, been principal of an online school, directed a professional development program, and succeeded as a social benefit entrepreneur. He loves creativity, collaborative innovation, and laughing at himself. A graduate of Trinity University in San Antoni, Rushton founded and is executive director of the educational nonprofit Next Vista for Learning, which houses a free library of hundreds of short videos by and for teachers and students at NextVista.org
The author of two books, Making Your school Something Special and Making Your Teaching Something Special, Rushton works with schools around the work to make them more personally and professionally satisfying places for everyone. His graduate research At Stanford University include using speech recognition technology with beginning students of Japanese in computer-based role playing scenarios for developing language skills. In the 1990’s his work with teenagers at a high school in California led him to begin using internet and video technologies to make learning more active, helping him reach students who had struggle under more traditional approaches.